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In a remote location outside of Richmond, Va., missionaries appointed with the International Mission Board undergo a season of training before embarking on their first term of mission service. Within the next three years, IMB hopes to have increased its missionary force by an additional 500 personnel carrying the gospel to some of the least reached people in the world. Just prior to leaving American soil, these will come through this International Learning Center, and many of these will come from Georgia Baptist churches.

Since my first well remembered awareness as a young child was the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, this born and bred Londoner has been  inspired by a monarch who has lived a longer-than-long life that included many trials and tribulations such as the “annus horribilis.” 

The Georgia Baptist Mission Board has a mission. That mission is to support pastors, strengthen churches, and reach the lost with the Gospel. One of the most visible ways in which the board uses contributions to the Cooperative Program to further those goals is the Georgia Baptist Disaster Relief program.

In 2 Chronicles 34, we read about the recovery of a hidden treasure. In his eighteenth year as king of Judah, Josiah began repairing the temple in Jerusalem. In the process, a priest found the Book of the Law in the temple.

It was Edmund Burke who once said, “All that is required for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.” The first responsibility of a person living in a republic is to participate. And nothing characterizes our responsibility to participate more than voting for our elected officials.

Walk through the doors of Beaverdam Baptist Church on Sunday mornings and you’ll feel the love. You can’t escape the smiles, the handshakes, the hugs. Pastor Chuck Cook says that’s why Beaverdam is going great guns right now. Since Cook became pastor less than three years ago, the 200-year-old church in rural Georgia, an hour northeast of Atlanta, has seen a resurgence in attendance, memberships, and baptisms. The sanctuary and parking lot have been filled with an average of about 130 people, forcing Beaverdam’s leadership to start a second Sunday morning service to better accommodate the crowds.

It’s great to see Georgia Baptist churches getting behind the Mission Georgia offering in a big way this year. And why not? The Mission Georgia offering provides churches a means to make a huge gospel impact in our state. With the pandemic subsiding and worship attendance on the rise, churches are poised to potentially top the $1.25 million given last year through the Mission Georgia  offering.

In as little as two weeks, the U.S. Senate could vote on the deceptively named “Respect for Marriage Act.” This proposed bill threatens Americans who follow the biblical definition of marriage, and it should be of concern to every pastor and person of faith. This legislation enshrines same-sex marriage into federal law and jeopardizes the religious freedom of millions of Americans who follow the biblical definition of marriage as being between one man and one woman.

Most older Baptists can recall being a part of local church revivals, tent revivals, brush arbor revivals, camp meetings, simultaneous revivals, and city-wide crusades. Many of those dear souls were …

Commentary: Be kind when you drive

I witnessed another near miss. Driving to the office, I was eastbound on the two-lane road with a double-yellow line and a 35 MPH speed limit. I was safely behind a car and met another car going west when, suddenly, a driver flew up behind the westbound vehicle and passed, nearly hitting the car in front of me head-on. It barely missed clipping both cars as the driver whipped around and continued his frenzied journey, vastly exceeding the speed limit.

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